Your Rights

If you become a victim of crime you will have the following 12 overarching rights as set out in the Victims Code.  The Victims Code outlines the minimum level of information and service victims can expect at every stage of the justice process.

Your Rights Explained

If you require advice or support in relation to these rights, then the Victim Care and Advice Service can help you.

1

To be able to understand and to be understood

You have the right to be given information in a way that is easy to understand and to be provided with help to be understood, including, where necessary, access to interpretation and translation services.

2

To have the details of the crime recorded without unjustified delay

You have the right to have details of the crime recorded by the police as soon as possible after the incident. If you are required to provide a witness statement or be interviewed, you have the right to be provided with additional support to assist you through this process.

3

To be provided with information when reporting the crime

You have the right to receive written confirmation when reporting a crime, to be provided with information about the criminal justice process and to be told about programmes or services for victims. This might include services where you can meet with the suspect or offender, which is known as Restorative Justice.

4

To be referred to services that support victims and have services and support tailored to your needs

You have the right to be referred to services that support victims, which includes the right to contact them directly, and to have your needs assessed so services and support can be tailored to meet your needs. If eligible, you have the right to be offered a referral to specialist support services and to be told about additional support available at court, for example special measures. 

5

To be provided with information about compensation

Where eligible, you have the right to be told about how to claim compensation for any loss, damage or injury caused as a result of crime.

6

To be provided with information about the investigation and prosecution

You have the right to be provided with updates on your case and to be told when important decisions are taken. You also have the right, at certain stages of the justice process, to ask for decisions to be looked at again by the relevant service provider.

7

To make a Victim Personal Statement

You have the right to make a Victim Personal Statement, which tells the court how the crime has affected you and is considered when sentencing the offender. You will be given information about the process.

8

To be given information about the trial, trial process and your role as a witness

If your case goes to court, you have the right to be told the time, date and location of any hearing and the outcome of those hearings in a timely way. If you are required to give evidence, you have the Right to be offered appropriate help before the trial and, where possible, if the court allows, to meet with the prosecutor before giving evidence.

9

To be given information about the outcome of the case and any appeals

You have the right to be told the outcome of the case and, if the defendant is convicted, to be given an explanation of the sentence. If the offender appeals against their conviction or sentence, you have the Right to be told about the appeal and its outcome.

10

To be paid expenses and have property returned

If you are required to attend court and give evidence, you have the right to claim certain expenses. If any of your property was taken as evidence, you have the Right to get it back as soon as possible.

11

To be given information about the offender following a conviction

Where eligible, you have the right to be automatically referred to the Victim Contact Scheme, which will provide you with information about the offender and their progress in prison, and if/when they become eligible for consideration of parole or release. Where applicable, you also have the Right to make a new Victim Personal Statement, in which you can say how the crime continues to affect you.

12

To make a complaint about your Rights not being met

If you believe that you have not received your rights, you have the right to make a complaint to the relevant service provider. If you remain unhappy, you can contact the Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman

Frequently asked questions

Your Rights

As a victim am I entitled to get support?

If you do decide to report to the police then there is a government document called the Victims Code which details the support and information you should get from criminal justice agencies. These are organisations such as the police, Crown Prosecution Service and the courts.

Your Rights

As a victim of crime can I claim compensation?

If you have been a victim of a violent offence, you may be eligible for compensation from the Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority (CICA).

To find out more, visit: www.gov.uk/claim-compensation-criminal-injury or call CICA on 0800 0149757.

If you need assistance with making a claim then we can help you with that free of any charge

Your Rights

How do I let the court know about the impact the crime has had on me?

Making a Victim Personal Statement (VPS) gives you a voice in the criminal justice process. The VPS lets you explain in your own words how a crime has affected you physically, emotionally, financially or in any other way.

Making a VPS is your choice. You do not have to make one if you do not want to but if you do choose to make a VPS, it can be written or recorded.

If you need help in preparing a VPS then we can help with that.

Your Rights

What if the police or the Crown Prosecution Service have decided to take No Further Action against a person they arrested?

Under certain circumstances you have a right to review that decision, we can help you with this if that is what you would like to do.

Any Questions

If you have any questions about our services please do not hesitate to contact us

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